The Roots of Impact

At the beginning of the 2018 school year my daughter started working in grade schools toward a very meaningful initiative. Upon being asked to participate in the Roots of Empathy program I was unclear about what it would look like, however, my interest peaked, and we scheduled a meet and greet with our potential instructor. It went very well and on our first day I got my daughter ready in her little ‘teacher’ uniform (cue the proud tears of delight!) and we set out for our first session working with grade 7 students. She was 4 months old and I could see that she was a little overwhelmed with entering a new, busy environment. I held her tight as she clung to the neck of my shirt with a white-knuckle grip and intensely wide eyes. Our instructor guided us through an educational session about her capabilities, milestones and her general demeanor. I was delighted to see that the students were both curious and very respectful of her need for comfort and quiet ‘indoor voices’. Upon getting home and reflecting I was excited to continue our Roots of Empathy journey and all that we would subsequently experience as a community of shared learning.

But what is a PPAH? I used to call myself the pre-parent type of a-hole (bonus points if you count how many times I use that phrase in this piece) aka the PPAH (pre-parent-a**-hole).  Let’s paint a picture of who this person was, seven…

Making The Switch From Coffee To Matcha

I’m a mom, and I am a walking caffeine stereotype. Even as I’m typing this, my brain is shot because I haven’t slept in since Obama’s first term, and I can’t get anything done without some form of caffeine assistance, much like all parents before me.

 

Doubling down on motherhood with my New York heritage means coffee was not only a part of my routine, but my identity. Setting aside my own roots, coffee is a huge part of our culture. In a super outdated, but probably still accurate infographic posted by Massive Health in 2012, New Yorkers were consuming 6.7 times the amount of coffee than people anywhere else in the US. And since I’m based in Canada right now, here’s a little fact about Canada: it turns out maple syrup isn’t the only thing this country loves. Statista reports 4.87 million 60kg bags of coffee consumed in 2017/2018, higher than the 2014 figure which showed that 67% of hot drinks in Canada were coffee. So in North America alone, we have a serious coffee crush.

Postpartum Depression? Or Postpartum Oppression? Part 2

Seeing this unfold, my husband strongly encouraged me to try again.   To find a doctor that seemed to understand me better and so I tried. I saw another doctor, and sobbing, I explained what was happening.  How I no longer knew who I was, how I couldn’t be happy anymore, never left my house and had completely given up on being anything of who I was before.  She was kind and listened sympathetically but again, encouraged medication. I explained my fears and she said she could start me off low, and generally increase and I made a commitment to her and myself that I would try.  Again, I filled the prescription and made my best effort to take it. But googling this new medication won over and I couldn’t do it. You may be asking yourself, seriously why didn’t you just take it? And I did too. Trust me.  There was so much guilt within me. Guilt at what my life had become, what my husband had to silently endure and the opportunities my Grace was missing. I went back to the doctor, again sobbing, almost begging forgiveness at not being able to take them.  She had ideas. One was that he could hide the medication in my food. That didn’t sit well with me. That wasn’t the path to betterness. Our marriage was a trustful one and this seemed to break that trust. Sure I would have been telling him to do it, but it allowed a new kind of sneakiness in.  One that I didn’t want. This doctor had granted me permission to take stress leave, so thankfully I hadn’t had to be around my students during this time (I was an EA, which meant I worked with special needs students within the district) but in doing this, I had to complete several tasks as requested by my employer in order to be paid an EI type of wage while I was off.

Tiny Home Life

   They make shows about them, everyone talks about how cute they are, but “I could never actually live in that.” They’re kind of trendy, kind of confusing, kind of cute, and totally captivating. They are tiny homes, and in many places in the US and Canada, they’re becoming an attractive alternative to people who don’t want to stomach exorbitant real estate prices. Whenever you see shows based around these structures, they usually follow either one person or a couple living together. Rarely, if ever, do families get showcased. Speaking from experience, I can say there’s a good reason for that. Living in a tiny home, with children, spouse, and pets, is not for the faint of heart. I know this, because this is me.

Applebarn at Taves Family Farm – Opens on August 17th! Get ready for August, because the Applebarn is officially back open!!! About Taves Family Farm We care about the future of our land, our children, and community. For this reason, we will always grow and share farm-to-table…