Author

Lee Abrahams

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Shopping Local and Ethical Without Busting Bank

 

We’ve all heard it. “I want to support local or ethical, but I just can’t afford it.” This is basically how big box retailers thrive – they churn out mass volume for cheap labor and cost, and families on a budget flock. This isn’t to shame, because all of us do it. I love my Target runs or saving up coupons to get everything my daughter needs from Gap. I’m writing this because most of us have a heart for being more ethically conscious, and wanting to provide a cleaner, less-polluted world for our kids, but need some help doing it. So if you are from BC or Canada in general, here are some helpful tips for how to afford ethically made products.

Making The Switch From Coffee To Matcha

I’m a mom, and I am a walking caffeine stereotype. Even as I’m typing this, my brain is shot because I haven’t slept in since Obama’s first term, and I can’t get anything done without some form of caffeine assistance, much like all parents before me.

 

Doubling down on motherhood with my New York heritage means coffee was not only a part of my routine, but my identity. Setting aside my own roots, coffee is a huge part of our culture. In a super outdated, but probably still accurate infographic posted by Massive Health in 2012, New Yorkers were consuming 6.7 times the amount of coffee than people anywhere else in the US. And since I’m based in Canada right now, here’s a little fact about Canada: it turns out maple syrup isn’t the only thing this country loves. Statista reports 4.87 million 60kg bags of coffee consumed in 2017/2018, higher than the 2014 figure which showed that 67% of hot drinks in Canada were coffee. So in North America alone, we have a serious coffee crush.

Tiny Home Life

   They make shows about them, everyone talks about how cute they are, but “I could never actually live in that.” They’re kind of trendy, kind of confusing, kind of cute, and totally captivating. They are tiny homes, and in many places in the US and Canada, they’re becoming an attractive alternative to people who don’t want to stomach exorbitant real estate prices. Whenever you see shows based around these structures, they usually follow either one person or a couple living together. Rarely, if ever, do families get showcased. Speaking from experience, I can say there’s a good reason for that. Living in a tiny home, with children, spouse, and pets, is not for the faint of heart. I know this, because this is me.